A raw blend of music, culture, prose and photos.

 

theworldwelivein:

The Spirit of Iceland | Svínafellsjökull glacier, Skaftafell, Southern Iceland, Europe©  www.lichtjahre.eu
Photographer notes:Dramatic cloud sceneries with stray sun light are typical for Iceland. Such unique moods of the light arise from low elevation sunlight not reaching the ground that falls through broken multi-layered cloud decks. This indirect light is causing different hues and light intensities at the surface. The black hills in the background belong to the 330 ft (100 m) high terminal moraine of Svínafellsjökull glacier in Skaftafell, southern Iceland. The moraine is composed out of volcanic breccia eroded by the glacier from the surrounding mountains. The steep ice fall of Svínafellsjökull follows gravity at a speed of 3.3 ft (1 m) per day. Hence, the ice of the bordering glacial lake, that is up to 1.3 ft (40 cm) thick, is steeply piled up at the terminal moraine. This glacial drift of 0.4 inch (1 cm) within 15 minutes causes the ice of the glacier and the ice on the lake to crack constantly under this immense pressure. A multitude of tension cracks form within the ice. This produces a stunning network of parallel aligning white lines. The cracking sounds produced by the drifting ice, the harsh winter conditions at 17°F (-8°C) and chilly winds together with the impressive light situation made this experience on the ice unforgettable. 

theworldwelivein:

The Spirit of Iceland | Svínafellsjökull glacier, Skaftafell, Southern Iceland, Europe
©  www.lichtjahre.eu

Photographer notes:
Dramatic cloud sceneries with stray sun light are typical for Iceland. Such unique moods of the light arise from low elevation sunlight not reaching the ground that falls through broken multi-layered cloud decks. This indirect light is causing different hues and light intensities at the surface. The black hills in the background belong to the 330 ft (100 m) high terminal moraine of Svínafellsjökull glacier in Skaftafell, southern Iceland. The moraine is composed out of volcanic breccia eroded by the glacier from the surrounding mountains. The steep ice fall of Svínafellsjökull follows gravity at a speed of 3.3 ft (1 m) per day. Hence, the ice of the bordering glacial lake, that is up to 1.3 ft (40 cm) thick, is steeply piled up at the terminal moraine. This glacial drift of 0.4 inch (1 cm) within 15 minutes causes the ice of the glacier and the ice on the lake to crack constantly under this immense pressure. A multitude of tension cracks form within the ice. This produces a stunning network of parallel aligning white lines. The cracking sounds produced by the drifting ice, the harsh winter conditions at 17°F (-8°C) and chilly winds together with the impressive light situation made this experience on the ice unforgettable. 

I just got a fish-eye filter for my D40x, so I’ve been taking some experimental shots. This is my girlfriend’s new puppy, Patán.

I just got a fish-eye filter for my D40x, so I’ve been taking some experimental shots. This is my girlfriend’s new puppy, Patán.

The lights dimmed, the music sparked, and with it, hundreds of little fires shown brightly around Teatro Caupolican in Santiago, Chile. A distinct smell filled the vintage theater (built in 1936) as smoke began to rise between red, yellow and green light. The second annual Reggae Fest was, slowly, climbing to new heights…
I really wasn’t a big fan of the show and I’m not really sure it deserves a write-up, so I’ll just post one of my favorite photos of the night…

The lights dimmed, the music sparked, and with it, hundreds of little fires shown brightly around Teatro Caupolican in Santiago, Chile. A distinct smell filled the vintage theater (built in 1936) as smoke began to rise between red, yellow and green light. The second annual Reggae Fest was, slowly, climbing to new heights…

I really wasn’t a big fan of the show and I’m not really sure it deserves a write-up, so I’ll just post one of my favorite photos of the night…